Covers & Content Annual Review 2016, Part 3: Flare

The 2016 publishing year is over for our three favourite Canadian fashion magazines, so it’s time to look back on every issue printed this year by Elle Canada, Fashion, and Flare, to see how diverse they were overall compared to last year. Up next is FASHION!

For a review of the Covers & Content project, please check out the FAQ page here.

Closet Feminist Terminology

Whiteout Issue: an issue of a fashion magazine where neither the cover star nor models booked/used for any of the major editorials are people of colour.

Token Diversity Spread: When a fashion magazine books/uses an ensemble of models, including some models of colour or models representing other minorities in the fashion world (i.e., plus size models or visibly older models), but are careful not to allow the minorities chosen to make up the majority of the spread or the majority of models chosen.

Has FASHION improved at all over the years? Check out our data from the last three years.

FASHION 2013 Annual Review

FASHION 2014 Annual Review

FASHION 2015 Annual Review

Did you miss Part 1 of our 2016 review focused on Elle Canada? Check it out here.

Part 2 of our 2016 review focused on FASHION can be found here.

***

This review is bittersweet, because as of January, 2017, FLARE will no longer be doing print issues. Flare was not perfect, but it’s reporting was timely and interesting. We will truly miss this Canadian fashion magazine.

That being said, did this glossy go out with a bang or a whimper? Read on to find out.

JANUARY

The January 2016 issue of Flare was technically its Winter 2015 issue, covering December 2015 as well.

Grimes was on the cover. There was one fashion editorial in this issue featuring one thin, white model, making this issue of Flare a Whiteout Issue.

FEBRUARY

Ilana and Abbi of Broad City were on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial in this issue featuring one thin, white model, making this issue of Flare a Whiteout Issue as well.

MARCH

Rebel Wilson was on the cover.

For a third month in a row, Flare put out a Whiteout Issue–the one fashion editorial this month featured one thin, white model.

APRIL

The April cover of Flare featured Ania Boniecka, Sonya Esman, Alanna Durkovich, Kayla Seah, and Dajana Rads. It bears noting that the cover was really more of a tedious Joe Fresh advertorial.

There was one fashion editorial in the April issue, starring one thin, white model.

MAY

Shay Mitchell was on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial this month starring one thin, white model.

JUNE/JULY

The Summer issue of Flare featured Ellie Goulding on the cover.

There were two fashion editorials in this issue. The first starred a thin, mixed-race model, the second starred Caitriona Balfe who is thin and white.

AUGUST

Herieth Paul was on the cover.

Above: Herieth Paul in Flare’s August issue.

There were two fashion editorials, counting Paul’s cover story. The second editorial starred one thin, white model.

SEPTEMBER

Priyanka Chopra was on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial in this issue, starring one thin, white model.

OCTOBER

Bella Hadid was on the cover.

Above: From the second fashion editorial in Flare October 2016

There were two editorials in this issue including Hadid’s cover story. The second editorial featured three thin models, two of them were women of colour.

NOVEMBER

Mandy Moore was on the cover.

Above: Evy Jane stars in the one fashion editorial in Flare November 2016

There was one fashion editorial in this month’s issue, starring one thin model of colour.

DECEMBER

Aww, Flare’s last print issue 🙁

Anna Kendrick was on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial in this month’s issue, starring one thin model of colour.

Covers & Content Annual Review 2016, Part 2: FASHION

The 2016 publishing year is over for our three favourite Canadian fashion magazines, so it’s time to look back on every issue printed this year by Elle Canada, Fashion, and Flare, to see how diverse they were overall compared to last year. Up next is FASHION!

For a review of the Covers & Content project, please check out the FAQ page here.

Closet Feminist Terminology

Whiteout Issue: an issue of a fashion magazine where neither the cover star nor models booked/used for any of the major editorials are people of colour.

Token Diversity Spread: When a fashion magazine books/uses an ensemble of models, including some models of colour or models representing other minorities in the fashion world (i.e., plus size models or visibly older models), but are careful not to allow the minorities chosen to make up the majority of the spread or the majority of models chosen.

Has FASHION improved at all over the years? Check out our data from the last three years.

FASHION 2013 Annual Review

FASHION 2014 Annual Review

FASHION 2015 Annual Review

Did you miss Part 1 of our 2016 review focused on Elle Canada? Check it out here.

***

FASHION is such an odd magazine. It is by far and away the most popular Canadian fashion magazine, arguably featuring the more “aspirational” aspects of a traditional fashion magazine. As such, the content is usually quite dry and conservative. The reporting is a snooze, with the exception of the cover stories which are done by Elio Iannacci (whose feminist reporting and engaging interviews are a CF favourite).

This year, FASHION remained somewhat of an enigma. On the one hand, FASHION came out on top with the most issues featuring a woman of colour on the cover. On the other hand, it tied with Elle Canada for the most Whiteout Issues, which indicates the issues were either super awesome and diverse, or bizarrely whitewashed.

FASHION also stands out in 2016 for publishing two issues featuring an Asian woman on the cover (Soo Joo Park and Michelle Phan)–neither Elle Canada nor Flare managed to publish even one issue with an Asian woman on the cover, though they did publish issues with mixed race women.

That being said, FASHION is also unique in that it is the only Canadian fashion magazine this year that did not have a black woman on the cover solo. Elle Canada had Beyoncé, and Flare had Herieth Paul exclusively. Normani Kordei shared a cover with the rest of Fifth Harmony in the Summer issue of FASHION.

And now for the month-by-month breakdown!

JANUARY

FASHION does Winter issues, covering December/January. As such, the January issue of 2016 features the same data as their December 2015 issue. Chiara Ferragni was on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial in the December 2015/January 2016 issue of FASHION, and it starred one thin, white model. The editorial featured a racist collection, rather adding insult to injury considering this issue of FASHION was a Whiteout Issue.

FEBRUARY

Above: Natalie Dormer in the Feb 2016 issue of FASHION

The February issue was also a Whiteout Issue, starring Natalie Dormer on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial in this issue starring one thin, white model.

MARCH

For a third month in a row, FASHION produced a Whiteout Issue. Olivia Palermo was on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial in this issue starring one thin, white model.

APRIL

Finally, FASHION showed a little bit of diversity on their pages with Soo Joo Park on the cover (image from the shoot below).

There was one fashion editorial in this issue starring one thin, white model.

MAY

Olivia Munn was on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial in this issue starring one thin, white model.

JUNE/JULY

Fifth Harmony was on the cover of the Summer issue (covering June and July 2016), comprised of Dinah Jane Hansen, Ally Brooke Hernandez, Normani Kordei, Camila Cabello, and Lauren Jauregui.

There was one fashion editorial this month, starring one thin, white model.

AUGUST

Michelle Phan was on the cover.

Above: from the August 2016 issue of FASHION

There was one fashion editorial in this issue starring one thin, mixed-race model.

SEPTEMBER 

Karlie Kloss was the cover star of a boring Joe Fresh advertorial.

There are two fashion editorials in this issue. The first stars one thin, white model. The second stars Canadian mixed-race model Mackenzie Hamilton.

OCTOBER

Kate Bosworth was on the cover.

There was one fashion editorial this month, starring one thin, white model. This means that the October issue of FASHION was a Whiteout Issue.

NOVEMBER

Tatiana Maslany was on the cover.

Above: from FASHION November 2016

There were two fashion editorials in this issue. One starred one thin, white model. The second starred one thin model of colour.

DECEMBER

Above: from the FASHION Winter 2016 cover story

The December (and the January 2017 issue of FASHION) issue starred Hailee Steinfeld on the cover.

There were  two fashion editorials in this issue. One starred a thin, white model, and the second one starred one thin Latina/mixed race model.

Covers & Content Annual Review 2016, Part 1: Elle Canada

The 2016 publishing year is over for our three favourite Canadian fashion magazines, so it’s time to look back on every issue printed this year by Elle Canada, Fashion, and Flare, to see how diverse they were overall compared to last year. Up first is Elle Canada!

For a review of the Covers & Content project, please check out the FAQ page here.

Closet Feminist Terminology

Whiteout Issue: an issue of a fashion magazine where neither the cover star nor models booked/used for any of the major editorials are people of colour.

Token Diversity Spread: When a fashion magazine books/uses an ensemble of models, including some models of colour or models representing other minorities in the fashion world (i.e., plus size models or visibly older models), but are careful not to allow the minorities chosen to make up the majority of the spread or the majority of models chosen.

Has Elle Canada improved at all? Check out our data from the last three years.

Elle Canada 2013 Annual Review

Elle Canada 2014 Annual Review

Elle Canada 2015 Annual Review

***

cf_2016_ellecanada_allissues

Elle Canada has made some steady improvements since last year. In 2016, they had four cover stars of colour–last year, they had none. Diversity within the pages has also improved. This year, Elle Canada had four Whiteout Issues, and last year, they had five.

Another big win for this magazine–this year, Elle Canada was the only magazine of the three studied here to do a fashion editorial featuring a plus size model. That would be their October issue starring Ashley Graham.

cf_2016_coverscontent_ellecanada_tablesummary

And now the month-by-month breakdown.

JANUARY

The one and only fashion editorial in this month’s issue starred cover star Kate Bock, a thin, white model, which means that this month was a Whiteout Issue.

FEBRUARY

elle-canada-mackenzie-hamilton

Rita Ora was on the cover. There was one fashion editorial this month and it starred mixed-race model Mackenzie Hamilton.

MARCH 

ellecanada_march2016

There were three cover stars for this issue: Lilly Singh, Ebony Oshunrinde (Wondagirl), and Maria Qamar.

Despite the diversity of the cover, there were two fashion editorials this month, and both starred thin, white models.

APRIL

The April issue of Elle Canda was a Whiteout Issue. Iggy Azalea was on the cover. There were two fashion editorials this month, both starring one thin, white model each.

MAY

Beyoncé was on the cover.

elle-canada-15th-anniversary-featuring-beyonce-4

There were two fashion editorials in this issue. The first starred two thin, white models. The second starred one thin, white model.

JUNE

Elizabeth Olsen was on the cover.

There were two fashion editorials in this issue. The first starred on thin model of colour. The second editorial was a particularly offensive editorial starring one thin, white model.

JULY

Amanda Seyfried was on the cover.

There were two fashion editorials in this issue. the first starred one thin, white model. The second starred a thin model of colour.

AUGUST

ellecanada_august2016

Charlize Theron was on the cover.

ellecanada_august2016_02

There was one fashion editorial, starring an ensemble of five models. Two of the models were women of colour.

SEPTEMBER

Demi Lovato was on the cover.

There are two fashion editorials in this issue. Both star thin, white models.

OCTOBER

ellecanada_ashleygraham_october

Ashley Graham was on the cover.

There were two fashion editorials in this issue. One starred a thin, white model, and the other starred one thin, Latina model.

NOVEMBER 

Dakota Fanning was on the cover.

The November 2016 issue was a Whiteout Issue, as there were two fashion editorials in this issue, both starring thin, white models.

DECEMBER

Miranda Kerr was on the cover.

There were two fashion editorials this month. One starred one thin, Latina model. The other starred one thin, white model

Feminist Designers: SheNative

The Closet Feminist’s second instalment of Feminist Designers interviews Devon Fiddler, Chief Changemaker and Designer for SheNative Goods Inc. SheNative is based out of Saskatoon, and is a socially driven, handbag and accessories brand that aims to empower the Indigenous women.

SheNative_June20161

What inspired you to start your line SheNative?

I started SheNative out of a childhood dream of becoming a designer, my own life experiences as an Indigenous women, and my first career experiences. When I started SheNative, I had no fashion design background, little sewing experience, and went for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Politics (Aboriginal Public Administration).

After completing my degree, I worked as a Business Development Coordinator, working with clients on reserve who wanted to start a business. This sparked my passion of entrepreneurship, and brought my childhood dream swirling back into my head. I saw other entrepreneurs starting companies with a mission to have a positive social impact, and I decided that I wanted to start a fashion business that gives back.

I grew up out of a lot of negative experiences that many Indigenous women in Canada face, including seeing and experiencing family violence, being taken advantage of, domestic violence and more. I still see many of my friends and family struggle with what they went through; these experiences are so common among Indigenous women.

Through SheNative, I want to bring light into lives by showing the power of positivity, and showing other women that you can find it in yourself to make changes and overcome any negative experience you’ve had. I try to show that myself by practice, living healthy, and following my dream. I try to bring positive inspiration into the lives of others through the initiatives that we create in SheNative (Her 4 Directions Fashion Incubator), inspirational words, and showcasing what other Indigenous women are doing.

SheNative_June20162

SheNative focuses a lot on affirmations, positive thinking, social media campaigns beyond marketing, etc. Are there plans to evolve SheNative into a broader lifestyle brand?

Yes, I think that’s where we are heading with our brand. We are still figuring out what’s working and what’s not working. We are very new, so it takes time to build.

I started out with the idea that I would create very specific products. Initially, I wanted to start a clothing line that was more geared towards professional working women. After consulting with a product development company in Toronto, we found that it didn’t matter what we created: SheNative was going to be a company that empowered Indigenous women.

Initially, SheNative started by designing a handbag collection instead of a clothing line. Working with companies that hold ethical production standards, along with quality workmanship is really important to me.

Since starting, SheNative has really evolved as a brand, from quality handbags to graphic t-shirts. Our line goes from a higher-end to a fairly low price point. We are looking to build more products in the medium price point range. I think becoming a broader lifestyle brand would make the most sense for us moving forward.

SheNative_June2016

What have you learned working on SheNative that you couldn’t have learned anywhere else?

The fashion portion especially has been a big learning curve for me, and I am still learning a lot! I still leave the sewing to those who are best at it. I found the best way to learn is by just jumping in, doing, and being hands-on instead of taking technical courses in design.

For the business-side of things, I’ve entered as many entrepreneurship courses and classes, both online and in classrooms that I can find. I think you have to learn from mistakes along the way and pivot when things are not working.

What is a typical day for you as the head designer and founder of SheNative?

I am currently trying to create a typical day for me. At first it was chaotic; we had a lot of interviews and random media requests during our launch. Then, I started getting speaking requests, especially in the Indigenous community, as well as invitations to many different events like trade shows. At this time, I would often forget to eat, and stay up working on business stuff at all hours of the night.

Now, I’m establishing a bit of a routine. I wake up in the morning, have my breakfast, take my dog out for a walk, check emails, and then head out to our shared studio space. At the studio, I take on whatever tasks come our way from there including operational, sales, design, etc, which takes me to the end of the day; only sometimes do I take evening meetings. I also sit on three committees, so that takes of some of my free time. I now go to sleep at a decent hour, and always make time for myself.

SheNative_June20164

Your brand seems very dynamic with regards to how you reach your customer base—trade shows, craft fairs, farmers markets, pop up shops, conferences, and fashion week in addition to an online shop. How has this versatility affected/impacted SheNative?

We have been exploring what works and doesn’t work [in an attempt to find] our target market. Through this, we have found our target market is different than we thought it would be; you never know until you jump in and try. I have to admit, trying too much at once has had a negative impact on the business. After finding out something doesn’t work, you need to be strong at saying ‘no’, and moving forward with what actually works.

SheNative_June20163

SheNative recently completed a highly successful crowdfunding campaign, congratulations to the SheNative team! Be sure to follow SheNative and watch this exciting Canadian brand grow!

Shop SheNative here

SheNative on Facebook

SheNative Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter

Images by Axis Imagery. All images used with permission by SheNative

What I Would Have Worn to the 2016 Met Gala

I was talking with CF Advising Editor Lydia the other day, and we agreed on two things about this year’s Met Gala:

  1. The dresses were incredibly dull overall. A few stand-out looks, but overall just not as good as last year’s gala.
  2. Where was Janelle Monaé???? Her aesthetic totally embodies the theme of “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology.” It was an insult to us that she was not there.

So, let’s play a game. I’ll play stylist for myself, and show what I would wear if I were to attend (all looks by lady designers, of course)

IF YOU INSIST ON METALLICS, LET THEM NOT BE SILVER

zimmermann_fall2016_met

Above: Zimmermann Fall 2016

Vionnet_Spring2016_met2016

Above: Vionnet Spring 2016

09-vika-gazinskaya-fall-2016-ready-to-wear

Above: Vika Gazinskaya Fall 2016

The obvious choice for this event, the dresses above push past the ‘been there done that’ metallic column dress, especially since they are not silver. Lupita Nyong’o totally got the memo on this for this year’s event with her sparkly green dress.

The blue Zimmermann dress above was spot-on, I’d wear this whole look right off the runway as-is. I love the Vionnet dress above as well, it has a modest silhouette but a unique sheen. Plus, I think Lineisy Montero looks like an angel in it. The Vika Gazinskaya dress is quite playful, so it would need some careful styling to make sure it doesn’t get too costume-y.

EXTREME SILHOUETTES

I was kind of shocked at how safe the silhouettes were overall on the Met Gala red carpet. To me, that would be the first thing to reach for.

More dramatic silhouettes speak to architecture, machines–the late and great Zaha Hadid comes to mind as she envisioned the spaces of our future.

Another reason I would want a different silhouette is the freedom that should come with it: shapes that are neither feminine or masculine, that do not emphasize a waist or bust or broad shoulders.

rosie-assoulin-034-resort2016 rosie-assoulin-resort2016_1

I love Rosie Assoulin‘s designs, and I love how she insists on diversity for her lookbooks and presentations. The dress is a safer choice, I would do the extreme makeup with it (bleached eyebrows, dark lips, zany hair), then let the dress speak for iteself. For the jumpsuit, I would use the pure white as a blank canvas to bring in harsh metal accessories. Perhaps a simple circlet on my head, and matching metal cuffs on the wrist or upper arms.

commedesgarcons_fall2016_2 CommedesGarcons_fall2016

I think that Rei Kawakubo is a genius, though I have issues with the fact she never uses models of colour on her runways. Her two looks above from Commes des Garçons definitely wold have been my top top picks, and I think its kinda criminal no one wore her stuff to this year’s Gala. Seems so obvious. I love how the first dress has a vulva-shape to it–the future is female!

ANOTHER DIMENSION

04-iris-van-herpen-fall-2016-ready-to-wear

Above: Iris van Herpen Fall 2016

SimoneRocha_Spring2016

Above: Simone Rocha Spring 2016

Threeasfour_spring2016

Threeasfour Spring 2016

If I couldn’t get my hands on an actual 3D printed dress, I would look for dresses with a regular silhouette with 3D elements or dimensional details. Iris van Herpen is an obvious choice, but my only hang-up with the look above is that it’s too short. What can I say, I’m old-fashioned and think longer dresses are more red-carpet.

The Simone Rocha dress has the dimensionality I would want, but I would style it very carefully to emphasize the modernity of it, and play down the saccharine aspects of the dress.

The Threeasfour dress is pretty boring save the shoulder, so I would definitely take more beauty risks if I were to wear this dress.

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...